Physical health Self-Regulating System Collection

Alleviate • Beating – SRS

The ancient Chinese conceptualised Qi as the basic element to construct our universe and suggested it’s everywhere. They believed Qi had the essence like gas attribute, with no color, form, taste, and invisible, which could also be interpreted as energy or power.

When zooms in to living-thing, this energy will flow and circulate inside a body, to give life to a being.

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Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) believes that Qi can be classified according to its different functions, characteristics and movements, which are –  Yuan Qi 元氣, Zong Qi 宗氣, Ying Qi 營氣and Wei Qi 衛氣.

Each class helps regulate the complex functions of a body through “five viscera and six bowels” via different pathways. When any part of a body is clogged, regardless of which organ, system, or pathway, the “Qi” is unable to flow freely.

Beating, one of the alleviate methods, acts as the external force to help regulate the Qi at certain degrees, while relieving our tightened areas from “Work”. It’s a super simple method for us who need a quick fix.

So before diving into “Beating”, let’s take a look at what “Qi” actually is.

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Qi, also known as “Chi”, is vital and continuous. It keeps flowing regardless of how strong or weak. But the factors, such as environmental changes, personal emotional status, digestion, day & night cycle, and more, will have their impacts on the qi flowing.

Wait, it sounds like everything will affect or at least relating to our Qi! Yup, it all goes back to the philosophical side of Qi. As we now know there is a view that Qi is one of the fundamental substances to construct this universe, so everything within this universe is the result of qi movements and changes. So basically, we’re all connected.

This energy flowing inside our body, we need to actively regulate it from time to time through exercise, diet, and other regulating methods, to minimise/change/or adapt the impacts coming from both outside and inside of a body. Harmony, and Balance are the main goals and tenets in TCM of “Keeping the qi flow smoothly”.

Alleviate System is designed to do that.
In a more concrete sense, it means alleviating the “pains” and staying healthy.

While sicknesses won’t be healed through “alleviate system” because it’s more of an inside job in general, the system helps the participant relieving muscle pains, reducing stress, becoming more flexible, and keep us reconnecting with the body. These will contribute to preventing sicknesses creeping on our back and strengthening our bones structure, while becoming a calm, mindful individual. we live a stress-free and healthier life as a result.

So coming back to Beating. We can use either fist or hand to hit/smack our body of any part, with appropriate power. Here is an example of me using the fist:

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*Notice that this method is for short, temporary relief. For long term benefits, it should be combined along with other “alleviate methods”, and proper diets, good health care schedules with consistent efforts, and so on.

So when to implement?
– Whenever you need a quick fix for tightening areas.

For how long?
– From seconds to minutes, depending on how much your body needs to go for. *You’ll naturally know the length as you progress.

Tip(s) for carrying out:
– Use your back muscles so you feel less tired.
– Sore muscles, (due to overwork on muscle trainings for instance) best not to use “beating” while appropriate massaging and stretching are recommended.

The goal:
– To release the tension, but knowing it’s just a temporary method, you need [Massage] and [Resting] to tickle designated areas.

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@This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment. To learn more here.

Photo by  James Maxfield, Jason Leung on Unsplash

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